What should a site owner do if they think they might be affected by Panda?


How will webmaster come to know whether website is hit by Panda?

And, if  site is already hit, how to recover from Panda?

Answer: You need to read UNDERSTAND and implement Google Webmaster Guideline not when site hit but before and after that happens.

Implementation is a key.

Improve site contents on regular basis if possible.

Understanding Google Webmaster Guideline correctly – Success Factors for Implementation.

Answer from Matt Cutts ‎ Google Software Engineer:

Published on Sep 11, 2013

Reprinted with sole purpose to remind webmasters and website owners to read Google Webmaster Guideline.

Do not pay for SEO all info you every need Google provide.

But if you do not have time to read and follow simple and common scene instructions do not blame Google if your site is our of first page on Google Organic Search results
Some website owner looking for one single reason site was “hit” by algorithm update… ;-(

how to recover from google panda updateWhat counts as a high-quality site?

Our site quality algorithms are aimed at helping people find “high-quality” sites by reducing the rankings of low-quality content. The recent “Panda” change tackles the difficult task of algorithmically assessing website quality. Taking a step back, we wanted to explain some of the ideas and research that drive the development of our algorithms.

Below are some questions that one could use to access the “quality” of a page or an article. These are the kinds of questions we ask ourselves as we write algorithms that attempt to assess site quality. Think of it as our take at encoding what we think our users want.

Of course, we aren’t disclosing the actual ranking signals used in our algorithms because we don’t want folks to game our search results; but if you want to step into Google’s mindset, the questions below provide some guidance on how we’ve been looking at the issue:

  • Would you trust the information presented in this article?
  • Is this article written by an expert or enthusiast who knows the topic well, or is it more shallow in nature?
  • Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?
  • Would you be comfortable giving your credit card information to this site?
  • Does this article have spelling, stylistic, or factual errors?
  • Are the topics driven by genuine interests of readers of the site, or does the site generate content by attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?
  • Does the article provide original content or information, original reporting, original research, or original analysis?
  • Does the page provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
  • How much quality control is done on content?
  • Does the article describe both sides of a story?
  • Is the site a recognized authority on its topic?
  • Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
  • Was the article edited well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
  • For a health related query, would you trust information from this site?
  • Would you recognize this site as an authoritative source when mentioned by name?
  • Does this article provide a complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
  • Does this article contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
  • Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend?
  • Does this article have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
  • Would you expect to see this article in a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?
  • Are the articles short, unsubstantial, or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics?
  • Are the pages produced with great care and attention to detail vs. less attention to detail?
  • Would users complain when they see pages from this site?

Writing an algorithm to assess page or site quality is a much harder task, but we hope the questions above give some insight into how we try to write algorithms that distinguish higher-quality sites from lower-quality sites.

What you can do

We’ve been hearing from many of you that you want more guidance on what you can do to improve your rankings on Google, particularly if you think you’ve been impacted by the Panda update. We encourage you to keep questions like the ones above in mind as you focus on developing high-quality content rather than trying to optimize for any particular Google algorithm.

One other specific piece of guidance we’ve offered is that low-quality content on some parts of a website can impact the whole site’s rankings, and thus removing low quality pages, merging or improving the content of individual shallow pages into more useful pages, or moving low quality pages to a different domain could eventually help the rankings of your higher-quality content.

We’re continuing to work on additional algorithmic iterations to help webmasters operating high-quality sites get more traffic from search. As you continue to improve your sites, rather than focusing on one particular algorithmic tweak, we encourage you to ask yourself the same sorts of questions we ask when looking at the big picture. This way your site will be more likely to rank well for the long-term. In the meantime, if you have feedback, please tell us through our Webmaster Forum. We continue to monitor threads on the forum and pass site info on to the search quality team as we work on future iterations of our ranking algorithms.

Some ideas on how to evaluate the quality of a site:
http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspo…

Have a question? Ask it in our Webmaster Help Forum: http://groups.google.com/a/googleprod…

Want your question to be answered on a video like this? Follow us on Twitter and look for an announcement when we take new questions: http://twitter.com/googlewmc

More videos: http://www.youtube.com/GoogleWebmaste…
Webmaster Central Blog: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspo…
Webmaster Central: http://www.google.com/webmasters/

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Cool Visualization Of Facebook Users


Where Facebook Is Not Popular Yet?

Visualizing Friendships

by Paul Butler on Monday, December 13, 2010 at 5:16pm

… When the data is the social graph of 500 million people, there are a lot of lenses through which you can view it.

One that piqued my curiosity was the locality of friendship. I was interested in seeing how geography and political borders affected where people lived relative to their friends. I wanted a visualization that would show which cities had a lot of friendships between them …

Facebook is one of the largest websites in the world, with more than 500 million monthly users. The site was started in 2004 by founder and CEO <!—->Mark Zuckerberg when he was an undergraduate student at Harvard.

Since September 2006, anyone over the age of 13 with a valid e-mail address can join Facebook. Users can add “friends” and send them messages, post announcements, and update their personal profiles to notify friends about themselves.

The name of the service stems from the colloquial name for the book given to students at the start of the academic year by university administrations in the US. The intention of the book is to help students to get to know each other better.

Facebook is huge in North America, Europe, India, and Indonesia, but is almost unused in big swaths of Asia and North Africa.

Artist Ian Wojtowicz put together this graphic based on Facebook’s <!—->map of connections combined with NASA’s pictures of the earth at night. He then took the places where Facebook was inactive, pinpointed them to specific cities on the <!–NASA–>NASA map, and highlighted them in yellow.
The map was highlighted by Flowing Data earlier today.

Here’s the whole world.
Dark areas are where Facebook is most prominent, where yellow cities are places where few people use Facebook:

Facebook NASA mashup

Sources of Information:

Image: Ian Wojtowicz

http://station.woj.com/2011/07/unfacebook-world.html

The original Facebook blog post explaining the visualization in more detail and here’s a link to a high res version of the image.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Facebook

21 Interview Questions that you Might be Asked


Questions You May Be Asked During an Interview for Web Developer Position

Interviewing  Intermediate Web Developer’s Name:_____________

1. How is your experience relevant to this job?

2. What environments allow you to be more effective?

3. What situations excite and motivate you?

4. How have you handled criticism of your work?

5. Compare this job to others you are perusing.

6. What’s your dream job?

7. What industry sites and blogs do you read regularly?

8. Do you prefer to work alone or on a team? Please explain your point.

9. How comfortable are you with writing XHTML entirely by hand?
Please write HTML code for simple for transitional XHTML page:
with:
• all basic meta tags (as more as you think necessary),
• link to external sample.css file
• link to external sample.js file
• table with 2 rows and 2 columns,
• text link to external page,
• image link to external page
• insert image to the page
• embed iframe

10. Please provide links to your recently completed project. Please explain your role in the projects.
Example: Single web developer or/and web designer, web developer or/and web designer in the team…11. Can you write table-less XHTML? Do you validate your code?
Please write example of table-less XHTML page. We want to see sample of code.

12. What are a few of your favorite development tools and why?

13. What skills and technologies are you the most interested in improving upon or learning?

14. Provide link to your portfolio. Please explain why you build it this way.

15. What sized websites have you worked on in the past?
Please provide link and describe scope of the projects.

16. What are a few sites you admire and why? (from a webdev perspective)

17. I just pulled up the website someone’s built and the browser is displaying a blank page. Walk us through the steps you’d take to troubleshoot the problem.

18. What’s your favorite development language and why? What other features (if any) do you wish you could add to this language?

19. Do you find any particular languages or technologies intimidating?

20. What web browser do you use and why?

21. What are a few personal web projects you’ve got going on?

Social Media and Social Bookmarking Sites


Social Media and Social Bookmarking Sites

how to increase traffic

Social Media and Social Bookmarking Sites

Share your favorite sites on the Web with potential clients and business partners by commenting on, uploading and ranking different newsworthy articles. You can also create a member profile that directs traffic back to your company’s Web site.

  1. Reddit:Upload stories and articles on reddit to drive traffic to your site or blog.Submit items often so that you’ll gain a more loyal following and increase your presence on the site.
  2. Digg:Digg has a huge following online because of its optimum usability. Visitorscan submit and browse articles in categories like technology, business, entertainment,sports and more.
  3. Del.icio.us: Social bookmark your way to better business with sites like del.icio.us, which inviteusers to organize and publicize interesting items through tagging and networking.
  4. StumbleUpon:You’ll open your online presence up to a whole new audience just by adding the StumbleUpon toolbar to your browser and “channel surfing the Web.You’ll “connect with friends and share your discoveries,” as wellas “meet people that have similar interests.”
  5. Technorati:If you want to increase your blog’s readership, consider registering it with Technorati, a network of blogs and writers that lists top stories in categories like Business, Entertainment and Technology.
  6. Ning:After hanging around the same social networks for a while, you may feel inspired to create your own, where you can bring together clients, vendors, customers and co-workers in a confidential, secure corner of the Web. Ning lets user’s design free social networks that they can share with anyone.
  7. Squidoo:According to Squidoo, “everyone’s an expert on something. Share your knowledge!” Share your industry’s secrets by answering questions and designing a profile page to help other members.
  8. Furl: Make Furl “your personal Web file” by bookmarking great sites and sharing them with other users by recommending links, commenting on articles and utilizing other fantastic features.
  9. Tubearoo:This video network works like other social-bookmarking sites, except that it focuses on uploaded videos. Businesses can create and upload tutorials,commentaries and interviews with industry insiders to promote their own services.
  10. WikiHow:Create a how-to guide or tutorial on wiki.  How to share your company’s services with the public for free.
  11. YouTube:From the fashion industry to Capitol Hill, everyone has a video floating around on YouTube. Shoot a behind-the-scenes video from your company’s latest commercial or event to give customers and clients an idea of what you do each day.
  12. Ma.gnolia:Share your favorite sites with friends, colleagues and clients by organizing your bookmarks with Ma.gnolia. Clients will appreciate both your Internet-savviness and your ability to stay current and organized.

B2B Social Media Websites Integrations

External Blog RSS URL: https://infotechusa.wordpress.com
Twitter Account URL: http://twitter.com/infotechusa
Facebook Account URL: http://facebook.com/infotechusa
LinkedIn Account URL: http://www.linkedin.com/in/webdesignerny
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/1webmaker
For more information about social media networking, SEO tips, tricks, social media good practice, online tools, how to market your site and if you are looking for web site design and development agency visit New York Web Design Agency Website

Manage Social Media, Social Networking and New Media


Online revolution is often referred to as “Web 2.0”, “New Media”, “we media” or “social media.” While much of this “user-generated content” is being created by young people who’ve grown up surrounded by digital tools, they certainly don’t have a monopoly on the concept.
According to the Pew Internet Project, approximately 48 million Americans have posted content to the Internet, from family photos to blogs to YouTube videos.  And it’s not just the well-off or well-educated that are doing it.

High-speed Internet access has become more affordable, while digital production tools are easier to use than ever before. New platforms allowing people to post content online using telephones have opened up user-generated content to an even larger audience.  This has translated into a democratization of online content. The Pew research even suggests that lower-income users and people with limited education posting content online in numbers on par with their well-off, better educated peers.
As social media has become ubiquitous, it’s also begun to make some professional content producers nervous. User-generated content is generally of lower production quality than professional content, and is sometimes anonymous or of questionable value. One only needs to spend a few minutes surfing around YouTube to get a sense of the wide range of quality, with much of it being on the lower end of the scale.
Having said that, quality content does rise to the top, usually through one of two methods. Some sites employ a gatekeeper model in which website managers review and vet content before it’s posted, preventing inappropriate content from appearing on the site. Others use a model in which the online community is given access to all content, rating and reviewing it so the best content rises to the top.

Managing User Generated Content

While the majority of people submitting content will have the best intentions, sometimes they may do things that should raise flags. In other cases, people might try to use this as an opportunity to air grievances or cause trouble, so it’s necessary to be on the lookout for content that’s inappropriate for public consumption.
First, there’s the question of who should be reviewing the content. At minimum, web site owner should have peronaly review materials and all post before publishing. Need to make sure that “auto post”, “post without moderations” turned off. No post should be published without moderatin.
It’s necessary to have someone with strong editorial judgment, who can identify the potential pitfalls of a given piece of user content, and pay attention to the details of the stories being shared.

For larger web site, whoever is tasked with reviewing the user content will probably need some assistance, whether from other staff or interns. In either case, these teams must be trained to recognize certain red flags, so user content is scrutinized appropriately before being published publicly.

Managing Different Media Types
Blos and forums owners migh be delaing with three different types of content from the public: audio, text and photos. Each of these media types have their own specific issues that should be discussed.

Audio types of content.
Since users will be submitting their audio over the phone, you shouldn’t expect the sound quality to be stellar. Having said that, there are ways you can help members of the public to submit audio that’s as useful as possible.
It’s recommended that you publish basic guidelines on your site, such as the following:
Use your home phone rather than a mobile phone, because the audio quality is better;
Try to find a quiet place to make the call;
Don’t play any music while you’re talking;
Avoid using obscenities in your story;
Please stick to stories about your own personal experiences during the war;
If you have multiple stories, please submit them separately;
If there’s a maximum time limit, be sure to inform users.

Text and photos types of content.
Along with looking out for the aforementioned concerns, you
should emphasize the importance of submitting original works rather than stories from other sources. The concern is that a user might take a war story or image they’ve found elsewhere and submit it. Even if they give appropriate credit to the author, there are serious copyright concerns, as you would have to get written permission from the owner of the material to republish it. With that being the case, you need to make it clear to users that they can only submit their own content, and under no circumstances should they copy and paste materials from other sources.

For text entries, you can always copy and paste sections of a particular submission into a search engine like Google to see if it’s been published online. Another useful tool is the search engine a9.com, which also allows you to search the text of books sold by Amazon.com. This functionality is particularly powerful since it can help you identify text that’s been lifted from published materials.
Unfortunately, there isn’t a photo search tool that allows you to search for identical copies of the same photo.
Once again, though, search engines can help. Yahoo.com, flickr.com, google.com and altavista.com, just to name a few, all allow you to conduct image searches. So if a person submits a photo supposedly from Berlin, you can search and see if it’s been copied off the Internet. Even searching for generic terms like “Classic Music” will show you a list of the most popular photos for this topic, and you can familiarize yourself with some of them to recognize possible copyright infringements.

Remember, there’s no way to prevent copyright infringement 100%. The key thing is for you to make a good-faith effort. If a copyright holder ever contacts you and claims their copyright has been violated, the best thing to do is to take the content down immediately until the issue can be resolved. Usually the act of taking it down will satisfy copyright holders.

For more information about social media networking and SEO tips, tricks, social media  good practice, online tools and how to market your site visit New York Web Designer Agency Website

Introduction to Social Media. What is Social Media Networking?


Introduction to Social Media

Whether you’ve begun to experiment or remain on the sidelines, it’s a good time to learn more about what social media is, and whether it could be useful for you.

What social media is?

Social media is a set of tools that allows the audience create content and communicate among themselves. A few examples:
blogs, message boards or groups (like Google Groups or Yahoo Groups), commenting, ranking and sharing tools like you find on many news sites, blogs and operations like Digg social bookmarking and sharing tools like Delicious or Mixx user-generated content sites like YouTube and Flickr group instant messaging like Twitter live community chats, as standalones or complements to broadcasts platforms like Facebook and LinkedIn where people can create profiles, share content, create groups and interact in many other ways

What social media is not?
Social media is not content you, a public broadcaster, website or producer, create. (Blogs are a partial exception. See our blogging documents for more information on them.)
Some broadcasters and producers can have a hard time wrapping their brains around the idea of hosting, and publishing, content they don’t create. It’s likely to be lower quality than professionally produced material. It can confuse the audience. Why bother?

Why social media is scary?
Inviting people into a social environment you create is inherently risky. You can’t control what they say, about you or anybody else.
Of course you can screen for pornography, bad language, hate speech and so on. You can require people to sign in with an e-mail address or create a profile before contributing, to discourage anonymous attacks. You can pull down content that is obviously off-topic, purely commercial or libelous.
But if you try to edit (which is to say, censor) content beyond, that you’ll lose credibility. Even, or especially, if that content harshly criticizes a website, production or person involved, or expresses a fringe political opinion. If you’re going to host a public discussion, it may get messy.

So why bother to use social media?

Three main reasons:
Audience behavior is changing rapidly, and audiences increasingly expect a participatory media experience.
If they don’t get it from you, they’ll get it elsewhere. A portion of your audience will drift away. Truth is, that’s probably happening already.

Handled properly, social media can enhance traditional broadcasting with high-quality content no website or producer can create.
Pre-production, it can provide invaluable content and ideas. Post-broadcast, it can sustain a loyal audience that can feed new work.

Social media can foster public dialogue.
This is particularly true of, and important for, public media, whose audience is more educated and engaged in community life than most. Using social media can help you fulfill your public mission, to engage the public in public broadcasting.

Social media can build powerful links between people and websites, productions and content. At a time when audiences are fragmenting and media options multiply, social media can build a durable bond with your audience.

For more information about social media networking and SEO tips, tricks, social media  good practice, online tools and how to market your site visit web designer site.