All Winter Olympics Game Medals and Winner #Socialympics


The 2014 Winter Olympics

The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially the XXII Olympic Winter Games, or the 22nd Winter Olympics, is a major international multi-sport event being held in Sochi, Russia.

#Socialympics
The Winter Olympic Games
is a major international sporting event that occurs once every four years. The first celebration of the Winter Olympics was held in Chamonix, France, in 1924. The original sports were alpine and cross-country skiing, figure skating, ice hockey, Nordic combined, ski jumping and speed skating. The Games were held every four years from 1924 until 1936, after which they were interrupted by World War II. The Olympics resumed in 1948 and were celebrated every four years. The Winter and Summer Olympic Games were held in the same years until 1992, after a 1986 decision by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to place the Summer and Winter Games on separate four-year cycles in alternating even-numbered years. Because of the change, the next Winter Olympics after 1992 were in 1994.

XXII Olympic Winter Games Medals Count in Sochi 2014 Olympics : http://www.sochi2014.com/en/medals

The 2014 Winter Olympics, officially the XXII Olympic Winter Games, or the 22nd Winter Olympics, is a major international multi-sport event being held in Sochi, Russia. Officially scheduled for 7 February through 23 February 2014, opening rounds in figure skating, skiing, and snowboard competitions were held on the eve of the Opening Ceremony, 6 February 2014. Both the Olympics and 2014 Winter Paralympics are being organized by the Sochi Organizing Committee (SOC). Sochi was selected as the host city in July 2007, during the 119th IOC Session held in Guatemala City. The Sochi Olympics will be the first Olympics in the Russian Federation since the breakup of the USSR in 1991. The USSR was the host nation for the 1980 Summer Olympics in Moscow.

98 events in 15 winter sport disciplines will be held throughout the Games.
A number of new competitions—a total of twelve accounting for gender—will be held during the Games, including biathlon mixed relay, women’s ski jumping, mixed-team figure skating, mixed-team luge, half-pipe skiing, ski and snowboard slopestyle, and snowboard parallel slalom. The events will be held around two clusters of new venues; an Olympic Park was constructed in Sochi’s Imeretinsky Valley on the coast of the Black Sea, with Fisht Olympic Stadium and the Games’ indoor venues located within walking distance, and snow events will be held in the resort settlement of Krasnaya Polyana.

Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics Game Medals and Winner

Medal count

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Russian Fed. 13 11 9 33
2 Norway 11 5 10 26
3 Canada 10 10 5 25
4 United States 9 7 12 28
5 Netherlands 8 7 9 24
6 Germany 8 6 5 19
7 Switzerland 6 3 2 11
8 Belarus 5 0 1 6
9 Austria 4 8 5 17
10 France 4 4 7 15
11 Poland 4 1 1 6
12 China 3 4 2 9
13 Korea 3 3 2 8
14 Sweden 2 7 6 15
15 Czech Republic 2 4 2 8
16 Slovenia 2 2 4 8
17 Japan 1 4 3 8
18 Finland 1 3 1 5
19 Great Britain 1 1 2 4
20 Ukraine 1 0 1 2
21 Slovakia 1 0 0 1
22 Italy 0 2 6 8
23 Latvia 0 2 2 4
24 Australia 0 2 1 3
25 Croatia 0 1 0 1
26 Kazakhstan 0 0 1 1
Albania 0 0 0 0
Andorra 0 0 0 0
Argentina 0 0 0 0
Armenia 0 0 0 0
Azerbaijan 0 0 0 0
Belgium 0 0 0 0
Bermuda 0 0 0 0
Bosnia and Herzegovina 0 0 0 0
Brazil 0 0 0 0
Bulgaria 0 0 0 0
Cayman Islands 0 0 0 0
Chile 0 0 0 0
Chinese Taipei 0 0 0 0
Cyprus 0 0 0 0
Denmark 0 0 0 0
Dominica 0 0 0 0
Estonia 0 0 0 0
Georgia 0 0 0 0
Greece 0 0 0 0
Hong Kong, CHN 0 0 0 0
Hungary 0 0 0 0
Iceland 0 0 0 0
Independent Olympic Participant 0 0 0 0
India 0 0 0 0
IR Iran 0 0 0 0
Ireland 0 0 0 0
Israel 0 0 0 0
Jamaica 0 0 0 0
Kyrgyzstan 0 0 0 0
Lebanon 0 0 0 0
Liechtenstein 0 0 0 0
Lithuania 0 0 0 0
Luxembourg 0 0 0 0
Malta 0 0 0 0
Mexico 0 0 0 0
Monaco 0 0 0 0
Mongolia 0 0 0 0
Montenegro 0 0 0 0
Morocco 0 0 0 0
Nepal 0 0 0 0
New Zealand 0 0 0 0
Pakistan 0 0 0 0
Paraguay 0 0 0 0
Peru 0 0 0 0
Philippines 0 0 0 0
Portugal 0 0 0 0
Rep. of Moldova 0 0 0 0
Romania 0 0 0 0
San Marino 0 0 0 0
Serbia 0 0 0 0
Spain 0 0 0 0
Tajikistan 0 0 0 0
Thailand 0 0 0 0
The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 0 0 0 0
Timor-Leste 0 0 0 0
Togo 0 0 0 0
Tonga 0 0 0 0
Turkey 0 0 0 0
Uzbekistan 0 0 0 0
Venezuela 0 0 0 0
Virgin Isl, B 0 0 0 0
Virgin Isl, US 0 0 0 0
Zimbabwe 0 0 0 0

List of All Winter Olympics Game Medals and Winner Before Sochi 2014

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Norway 107 106 90 303
2 United States 87 95 71 253
3 USSR 78 57 59 194
4 Germany 68 72 48 188
5 Austria 55 70 76 201
6 Canada 52 45 48 145
7 Sweden 48 33 48 129
8 Switzerland 44 37 46 127
9 Finland 41 59 56 156
10 GDR 39 36 35 110
11 Italy 37 32 37 106
12 Russian Fed. 36 29 26 91
13 Netherlands 29 31 26 86
14 France 27 27 40 94
15 Korea 23 14 8 45
16 FRG 13 15 13 41
17 China 9 18 17 44
18 Japan 9 13 15 37
19 Unified Team 9 6 8 23
20 Great Britain 9 3 10 22
21 Olympic United Team of Germany 8 6 5 19
22 Czech Republic 5 5 6 16
23 Australia 5 1 3 9
24 Croatia 4 5 1 10
25 Estonia 4 2 1 7
26 Czechoslovakia 2 8 15 25
27 Poland 2 6 6 14
28 Liechtenstein 2 2 5 9
29 Belarus 1 4 4 9
31 Bulgaria 1 2 3 6
30 Kazakhstan 1 3 2 6
=33 Belgium 1 1 3 5
=33 Ukraine 1 1 3 5
32 Slovakia 1 2 1 4
35 Spain 1 0 1 2
36 Uzbekistan 1 0 0 1
38 Slovenia 0 2 5 7
39 Hungary 0 2 4 6
37 Yugoslavia 0 3 1 4
40 Latvia 0 2 1 3
42 DPR Korea 0 1 1 2
41 Luxembourg 0 2 0 2
45 Romania 0 0 1 1
=43 Denmark 0 1 0 1
=43 New Zealand 0 1 0 1

Victory Day 8-9 May – 68th Anniversary of Victory in World War II


С Днем Победы-Victory Day 9 May

Victory Day on May 8 and May 9 Two separate capitulation events took place at the time

Tuesday 8 May 1945 was ‘Victory in Europe’ (VE) Day, and it marked the formal end of Hitler’s war.

With it came the end of six years of misery, suffering, courage and endurance across the world.

Two separate capitulation events took place at the time. First, the capitulation to the Allied nations in Reims was signed on 7 May 1945, effective 23:01 CET 8 May. This date is commonly referred to as the V-E Day (Victory in Europe Day) in most western European countries. The other World War II victory day, the V-J day (Victory in Japan Day) is commemorated in August, and is of considerably lesser significance in Europe.

However, the Soviet Union’s only representative in Reims was General Ivan Susloparov, the Military Liaison Mission Commander. General Susloparov’s scope of authority was not entirely clear, and he had no means of immediate contact with the Kremlin, but nevertheless decided to sign for the Soviet side.
Susloparov was caught off guard; he had no instructions from Moscow. But if he did not sign, he risked a German surrender without Soviet participation. However, he noted that it could be replaced with a new version in the future. Joseph Stalin was later displeased by these events, believing that the German surrender should have been accepted only by the envoy of the USSR Supreme command and signed only in Berlin and insisted the Reims protocol be considered preliminary, with the main ceremony to be held in Berlin, where Marshal Zhukov was at the time, as the latter recounts in his memoirs:

“ [Quoting Stalin:] Today, in Reims, Germans signed the preliminary act on an unconditional surrender.The main contribution, however, was done by Soviet people and not by the Allies, therefore the capitulation must be signed in front of the Supreme Command of all countries of the anti-Hitler coalition, and not only in front of the Supreme Command of Allied Forces. Moreover, I disagree that the surrender was not signed in Berlin, which was the center of Nazi aggression. We agreed with the Allies to consider the Reims protocol as preliminary. ” (

Therefore, another ceremony was organized in a surviving manor in the outskirts of Berlin late on 8 May, when it was already 9 May in Moscow due to the difference in time zones. Field-Marshal Wilhelm Keitel submitted the capitulation of the Wehrmacht to Marshal Georgy Zhukov in the Soviet Army headquarters in Berlin-Karlshorst. To commemorate the victory in the war, the ceremonial Moscow Victory Parade was held in the Soviet capital on 24 June 1945 (four years and two days after the beginning of Operation Barbarossa – the invasion of the Soviet Union).

Victory Day Parade in Moscow every year May 9

Victory Day Parade in Moscow every year May 9

Victory Day 9 May marks the capitulation of Nazi Germany to the Soviet Union in the Second World War (also known as the Great Patriotic War in the Soviet Union). It was first inaugurated in the fifteen republics of the Soviet Union, following the signing of the surrender document late in the evening on 8 May 1945 (after midnight, thus on 9 May, by Moscow Time). The Soviet government announced the victory early on 9 May after the signing ceremony in Berlin.

Though the official inauguration happened in 1945 (which means it has been celebrated since 1946), the holiday became a non-labour day only in 1965 and only in some of the countries.

In the former Soviet Union this festival was celebrated to commemorate the Red Army’s victory over the Nazi forces.

National WWII Memorial “Save Our History” Teachers Guide and Interactive TimelineHistory GuideThe History Channel� developed a teacher’s manual that accompanied its special on the National World War II Memorial. You can download the guide by clicking on the links below. The document is in two parts and can be viewed with Adobe’s Acrobat Reader. (Download Adobe Acrobat Reader here.)

Download:
Part 1 (334k)
Part 2 (205k)

The History Channel

Note: The American Battle Monuments Commission is no longer raising funds for the WWII Memorial. Please do not implement the fund raising suggestions provided in chapter IV of the Teacher’s Guide unless for a cause other than the National WWII Memorial.

Victory in World War II References:

The First Four Notes of the Beethoven’s Fifth


 Ludwig van Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven in 1804, the year he began work on the Fifth Symphony. Detail of a portrait by W. J. Mähler

The Symphony No. 5 in C minor of Ludwig van Beethoven, Op. 67

Fifth Symphony was written in 1804–1808. It is one of the most popular and best-known compositions in classical music, and one of the most frequently played symphonies.

First performed in Vienna‘s Theater an der Wien in 1808, the work achieved its prodigious reputation soon afterwards. E. T. A. Hoffmann described the symphony as “one of the most important works of the time”.

It begins by stating a distinctive four-note “short-short-short-long” motif twice: (About this sound listen (help·info))

The symphony, and the four-note opening motif in particular, are well known worldwide, with the motif appearing frequently in popular culture, from disco to rock and roll, to appearances in film and television.

The opening of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 5.

Rendered from the following LilyPond code:

\version "2.8.7"
\layout { ragged-right = ##t }
{
 \clef treble
 \key c \minor
 \time 2/4
 r8 g'8 [ g'8 g'8 ] |
 ees'2\fermata |
 r8 f'8 [ f'8 f'8 ] |
 d'2 ( |
 d'2\fermata ) |
}

Ludwig van Beethoven – 5th Symphony 5 – Symphonie Nr. 5 – Best of Classical Music

beethoven-symphony-5-opening

Beethoven 5 th Symphony Opening

A new book, a new recording and some old instruments, all addressing the most memorable phrase in music: the opening of Beethoven‘s Fifth Symphony.

Matthew Guerrieri has written a book about this symphony, called The First Four Notes: Beethoven’s Fifth and the Human Imagination. (Source:http://www.wbur.org/npr/165495617/beethovens-famous-4-notes-truly-revolutionary-music)

Guerrieri writes about how Beethoven’s piece resonated with everyone from revolutionaries to Romantics, and German nationalists to anti-German resistance fighters.

So many people have found so much meaning in just those first four notes. But Guerrieri says that we really don’t know all that much of what Beethoven meant by them.

“The most common story that is told is that Beethoven allegedly said that the opening of the symphony was supposedly symbolizing fate knocking at the door. And this is probably an invention of his biographer, although we can’t really tell,” Guerrieri tells NPR’s Robert Siegel. “The other story going around at the time that Beethoven wrote it was that he had gotten the opening motif from the song of a bird. And that story just sort of fell away as the fate symbolism took over. But in Beethoven’s time, and to Beethoven, that actually would have been a fairly noble way of getting a musical idea.”

A Romantic ‘Bombshell,’ Delivered By Beethoven’s Fifth

English: Trio from Beethoven's 3rd. Symphony

English: Trio from Beethoven’s 3rd. Symphony (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In his book, Guerrieri writes:

“The Romantic era [of the early 19th century] never really ended … Every time a singer-songwriter is praised for projecting autobiographical authenticity, every time a movie star expresses the desire for a project that is ‘more personal,’ every time a flop is subsequently recategorized as a before-its-time masterpiece, all these are reverberations of the bombshell of Romanticism. And one of its pre-eminent delivery systems was Beethoven’s Fifth.”

The author adds: “I think that the Romantic era is another thing that we just sort of take for granted, because they’ve kind of always been there for us. But it’s amazing how many of these ideas were new around the time that Beethoven was writing music. The whole idea that music picks up where language leaves off — which is pretty much a cliche nowadays — that was a very specific Romantic idea, and it’s one that lasted. Also, the idea that the artist is somehow more privileged in accessing these things beyond language, in accessing the sublime, in accessing glimpses of the divine, however you want to characterize it. A lot of the ideas we use to talk about music are these ideas.”

And how to play those four notes? “The two things that have been argued about more than any other technical aspect of the opening are the tempo and the fermata that Beethoven stuck in the opening,” says Guerrieri. “A fermata is an indefinite hold — the conductor can hold onto a note as long as he wants.”

Holding On And Letting Fly: The Tempo

The question of tempo relates back to an interesting story Guerrieri tells in his book. The metronome was an invention of Beethoven’s day; he didn’t have access to it when he was writing his early symphonies. But later, he came into contact with it and loved the device. “He immediately buys one and sits down and starts going back over all his old scores and putting in metronome markings,” Guerrieri says. “And he picked a tempo for the Fifth Symphony that even today sounds really, astonishingly fast.”

The setting he chose was 108 beats per minute — so fast, so hard to play, Guerrieri says, that people have been theorizing for centuries about why Beethoven might have mismarked his own symphony. A broken metronome? Advancing deafness? Nobody knows.

Dah-Dah-Dah-Duh For ‘Victory’

Here’s one other story Guerrieri writes about those first four notes: In World War II, the anti-German resistance in occupied Belgium needed a simple graffiti symbol. A Belgian came up with the letter “V.” It stood equally for victoire — “victory” in French — and freiheit, or “freedom,” in Flemish. “Once that ‘V’ idea got back to the BBC and they wanted to start using it in their overseas broadcasts,” says Guerrieri, “it was at the BBC that they had the idea of combining it with the Morse code for ‘V’: three short and one long. Somebody at the BBC realized that matches Beethoven’s Fifth. So they could start using that as a little tag to symbolize that [something] was going to be a pro-Ally, propaganda broadcast from the BBC.”

For full article and interview with author visit: http://www.wbur.org/npr/165495617/beethovens-famous-4-notes-truly-revolutionary-music