❶Copy ❷Paste ❸Be Happy ★ Special Characters for Social Media are ♨HOT!☺


keyboard special characters💰 Special Characters Map for use on Twitter, FaceBook, Blogs and Social Media Sites

★ Free character maps online where you can copy and paste a special character from a Web page into

Here are some to get you started:

♈ ♉ ♊ ♋ ♌ ♍ ♎ ♏ ♐ ♑ ♒ ✐ ❂ ♓ ☨ ☧ ☦ ✁ ✃ ✄ ✎ ☬ ☫ ❉ ❆ ♅ ♇ ♆ ♙ ♟ ♔ ♕ ♖ ♗ ♘ © ® ™ … ∞ ≤ ≥ « » ç ∫ µ ◊ ı ¥ € £ ƒ $ º ª ‽ ♤ ✈ ♪ ☤ ♀ ☾ ☝ ♖ ✽ ☯ ♥ ☺ ♬ ☹ ☑ ✩ ☠ ✔ ✉ ♂ ✖ ✏ ♝ ❀ ♨ ❦ ☁ ✌ ♛ ❁ ☪ ☂ ★ ✇ ♺ ☭ ☃ ☛ ♞ ✿ ☮ ♘ ✾ ☄ ☟ ✝ ☼ ☚ ♟ ✺ ☥ ✂ ✍ ♕ ✵ ☉ ☇ ☈ ☡ ✠ ☊ ☋ ☌ ☍ ♁ ✇ ☢ ☣ ✣ ✡ ☞ ☜ ✜ ✛ ❥ ♗ ♚ ♛ ♜ ♝ ♞ Ω ≈ * § ∆ ¬ † & æ π ¡ ¿ ø å ∂ • ¶ œ Æ ß ÷ ‰ √ ª % ♠ ☎ ☻ ♫ ☒ ˚ ¯ º ‽ ≠ ˆ ˜ ˘ ∑ ƒ

❄ Add Special Characters in Twitter With the Windows Character Map

1. Click Start, open your list of All Programs, and open the Accessories folder. Navigate to System Tools and open the Character Map program.

2. Select a font from the list.

3. Check the Advanced view box.

4. In the Character set list, select Unicode.

5. In the Group by list, select All to browse all available characters by font, or select Unicode Subrange to browse characters by category.

6. Collect characters by highlighting them and clicking Select. When you are finished collecting, click Copy to copy the characters to the clipboard. You can now paste them into your message.
Use Facebook Emoticons

Here is the complete list of Facebook Chat emoticons and what character combinations create them. Note that these currently only work in Facebook Chat and will not display correctly in Facebook status updates or comments.

Smile 🙂 🙂 :] =)

Frown 😦 😦 :[ =(

Tongue 😛 😛 :-p :p =P

Grin 😀 😀 =D

Gasp :-O :O 😮 😮

Wink 😉 😉

Glasses 😎 8) B-) B)

Sunglasses 8-| 8| B-| B|

Grumpy 😡 >:-(

Unsure :/ :-/ :\ :-\

Cry 😥

Devil 3:) 3:-)

Angel O:) O:-)

Kiss :-* :*

Heart :O >:-O >:o >:-o

Pacman :v

Curly Lips :3

Robot :|]

Chris Putnam :putnam:

Shark (^^^)

Penguin <(“)

42 :42:

Using Emoticons in Gmail, Gchat, and Other Google Services

To unlock all available emoticons in Gmail:

1. Click the Gear icon in the top right corner, then click Labs.

2. Type emoji in the Search for labs box.

3. Enable Extra Emoji and click Save Changes. Enable the Extra Emoji option in Google Labs.

4. When composing a message, click the Insert Emoticon symbol to browse. Click any symbol to insert it into your message.

You must be in rich formatting mode to insert emoticons. In GChat, some emoticons are easy to select, but others are hidden:

1. Click the Gear icon in the top right corner, then click Mail Settings.

2. In the Chat tab, select Emoticons on at the bottom. Click Save Changes. Switch on emoticons in the Chat tab.

3. Open a new chat window and click the emoticon in the corner to browse GChat emoticons. Nice job!

One final tidbit: The emoticons listed in the GChat window aren’t all that are available.

Here is a top-secret list of hidden GChat emoticons:

Devil }:-)

Moustache :{

Robot [:|]

Poo ~@~

Rock Out \m/

Monkey :(|)

Bell +/’\

Crab V.v.V Wince >.<

Broken heart

Pig :(:)

Kiss 😡

keyboard and number pad special charactersUse your number keypad (ALT + Number Pad.) for these special characters

Special characters work on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Tumblr.

☺           ALt+1

☻          ALt+2

♥            ALt+3

♦             ALt+4

♣            ALt+5

♠             ALt+6

•             ALt+7

◘            ALt+8

○             ALt+9

◙            ALt+10

♂          Alt + 11

♀          Alt + 12

♪             ALt+13

♫            ALt+14

☼           ALt+15

░            ALt+176

▒            ALt+177

▓            ALt+178

│             ALt+179

┤            ALt+180

╡            ALt+181

╢            ALt+182

╖            ALt+183

╕            ALt+184

╣            ALt+185

║            ALt+186

╗            ALt+187

╝            ALt+188

╜            ALt+189

╛            ALt+190

┐             ALt+191

└             ALt+192

┴            ALt+193

┬            ALt+194

├            ALt+195

─             ALt+196

┼            ALt+197

╞            ALt+198

╟            ALt+199

╚            ALt+200

╔            ALt+201

╩            ALt+202

╦            ALt+203

╠            ALt+204

═            ALt+205

╬            ALt+206

╧            ALt+207

╨            ALt+208

╤            ALt+209

╥            ALt+210

╙            ALt+211

╘            ALt+212

╒            ALt+213

╓            ALt+214

╫            ALt+215

╪            ALt+216

┘             ALt+217

┌             ALt+218

Special Characters in HTML

left single quote &lsquo;
right single quote &rsquo;
single low-9 quote &sbquo;
left double quote &ldquo;
right double quote &rdquo;
double low-9 quote &bdquo;
dagger &dagger;
double dagger &Dagger;
per mill sign &permil;
single left-pointing angle quote &lsaquo;
single right-pointing angle quote &rsaquo;
black spade suit &spades;
black club suit &clubs;
black heart suit &hearts;
black diamond suit &diams;
overline, = spacing overscore &oline;
leftward arrow &larr;
upward arrow &uarr;
rightward arrow &rarr;
downward arrow &darr;
trademark sign &trade;
unused &#00;-
&#08;
horizontal tab
line feed
unused &#11;
space
exclamation mark ! !
double quotation mark &quot;
number sign # #
dollar sign $ $
percent sign % %
ampersand & &amp; &
apostrophe
left parenthesis ( (
right parenthesis ) )
asterisk * *
plus sign + +
comma , ,
hyphen
period . .
slash / &frasl; /
digits 0-9 0-
9
colon : :
semicolon ; ;
less-than sign < &lt; <
equals sign = =
greater-than sign > &gt; >
question mark ? ?
at sign @ @
uppercase letters A-Z A-
Z
left square bracket [ [
backslash \ \
right square bracket ] ]
caret ^ ^
horizontal bar (underscore) _ _
grave accent ` `
lowercase letters a-z a-
z
left curly brace { {
vertical bar | |
right curly brace } }
tilde ~ ~
ellipses &hellip;
en dash &ndash;
em dash &mdash;
unused ˜-
Ÿ
nonbreaking space &nbsp;  
inverted exclamation ¡ &iexcl; ¡
cent sign ¢ &cent; ¢
pound sterling £ &pound; £
general currency sign ¤ &curren; ¤
yen sign ¥ &yen; ¥
broken vertical bar ¦ &brvbar; or &brkbar; ¦
section sign § &sect; §
umlaut ¨ &uml; or &die; ¨
copyright © &copy; ©
feminine ordinal ª &ordf; ª
left angle quote « &laquo; «
not sign ¬ &not; ¬
soft hyphen ­ &shy; ­
registered trademark ® &reg; ®
macron accent ¯ &macr; or &hibar; ¯
degree sign ° &deg; °
plus or minus ± &plusmn; ±
superscript two ² &sup2; ²
superscript three ³ &sup3; ³
acute accent ´ &acute; ´
micro sign µ &micro; µ
paragraph sign &para;
middle dot · &middot; ·
cedilla ¸ &cedil; ¸
superscript one ¹ &sup1; ¹
masculine ordinal º &ordm; º
right angle quote » &raquo; »
one-fourth ¼ &frac14; ¼
one-half ½ &frac12; ½
three-fourths ¾ &frac34; ¾
inverted question mark ¿ &iquest; ¿
uppercase A, grave accent À &Agrave; À
uppercase A, acute accent Á &Aacute; Á
uppercase A, circumflex accent  &Acirc; Â
uppercase A, tilde à &Atilde; Ã
uppercase A, umlaut Ä &Auml; Ä
uppercase A, ring Å &Aring; Å
uppercase AE Æ &AElig; Æ
uppercase C, cedilla Ç &Ccedil; Ç
uppercase E, grave accent È &Egrave; È
uppercase E, acute accent É &Eacute; É
uppercase E, circumflex accent Ê &Ecirc; Ê
uppercase E, umlaut Ë &Euml; Ë
uppercase I, grave accent Ì &Igrave; Ì
uppercase I, acute accent Í &Iacute; Í
uppercase I, circumflex accent Î &Icirc; Î
uppercase I, umlaut Ï &Iuml; Ï
uppercase Eth, Icelandic Ð &ETH; Ð
uppercase N, tilde Ñ &Ntilde; Ñ
uppercase O, grave accent Ò &Ograve; Ò
uppercase O, acute accent Ó &Oacute; Ó
uppercase O, circumflex accent Ô &Ocirc; Ô
uppercase O, tilde Õ &Otilde; Õ
uppercase O, umlaut Ö &Ouml; Ö
multiplication sign × &times; ×
uppercase O, slash Ø &Oslash; Ø
uppercase U, grave accent Ù &Ugrave; Ù
uppercase U, acute accent Ú &Uacute; Ú
uppercase U, circumflex accent Û &Ucirc; Û
uppercase U, umlaut Ü &Uuml; Ü
uppercase Y, acute accent Ý &Yacute; Ý
uppercase THORN, Icelandic Þ &THORN; Þ
lowercase sharps, German ß &szlig; ß
lowercase a, grave accent à &agrave; à
lowercase a, acute accent á &aacute; á
lowercase a, circumflex accent â &acirc; â
lowercase a, tilde ã &atilde; ã
lowercase a, umlaut ä &auml; ä
lowercase a, ring å &aring; å
lowercase ae æ &aelig; æ
lowercase c, cedilla ç &ccedil; ç
lowercase e, grave accent è &egrave; è
lowercase e, acute accent é &eacute; é
lowercase e, circumflex accent ê &ecirc; ê
lowercase e, umlaut ë &euml; ë
lowercase i, grave accent ì &igrave; ì
lowercase i, acute accent í &iacute; í
lowercase i, circumflex accent î &icirc; î
lowercase i, umlaut ï &iuml; ï
lowercase eth, Icelandic ð &eth; ð
lowercase n, tilde ñ &ntilde; ñ
lowercase o, grave accent ò &ograve; ò
lowercase o, acute accent ó &oacute; ó
lowercase o, circumflex accent ô &ocirc; ô
lowercase o, tilde õ &otilde; õ
lowercase o, umlaut ö &ouml; ö
division sign ÷ &divide; ÷
lowercase o, slash ø &oslash; ø
lowercase u, grave accent ù &ugrave; ù
lowercase u, acute accent ú &uacute; ú
lowercase u, circumflex accent û &ucirc; û
lowercase u, umlaut ü &uuml; ü
lowercase y, acute accent ý &yacute; ý
lowercase thorn, Icelandic þ &thorn; þ
lowercase y, umlaut ÿ &yuml; ÿ
Alpha &Alpha; Α
alpha &alpha; α
Beta &Beta; Β
beta &beta; β
Gamma &Gamma; Γ
gamma &gamma; γ
Delta &Delta; Δ
delta &delta; δ
Epsilon &Epsilon; Ε
epsilon &epsilon; ε
Zeta &Zeta; Ζ
zeta &zeta; ζ
Eta &Eta; Η
eta &eta; η
Theta &Theta; Θ
theta &theta; θ
Iota &Iota; Ι
iota &iota; ι
Kappa &Kappa; Κ
kappa &kappa; κ
Lambda &Lambda; Λ
lambda &lambda; λ
Mu &Mu; Μ
mu &mu; μ
Nu &Nu; Ν
nu &nu; ν
Xi &Xi; Ξ
xi &xi; ξ
Omicron &Omicron; Ο
omicron &omicron; ο
Pi &Pi; Π
pi &pi; π
Rho &Rho; Ρ
rho &rho; ρ
Sigma &Sigma; Σ
sigma &sigma; σ
Tau &Tau; Τ
tau &tau; τ
Upsilon &Upsilon; Υ
upsilon &upsilon; υ
Phi &Phi; Φ
phi &phi; φ
Chi &Chi; Χ
chi &chi; χ
Psi &Psi; Ψ
psi &psi; ψ
Omega &Omega; Ω
omega &omega; ω
password dot
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What is SOPA? What is PROTECT IP? How SOPA and PIPA might affect you?


What is SOPA?

How SOPA would affect you?

SOPA and PIPA would censor the Web

SOPA and PIPA wouldn’t stop piracy

The Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), also known as House Bill 3261 or H.R. 3261, is a bill that was introduced in the United States House of Representatives on October 26, 2011, by House Judiciary Committee Chair Representative Lamar S. Smith (R-TX) and a bipartisan group of 12 initial co-sponsors. The bill, if made law, would expand the ability of U.S. law enforcement and copyright holders to fight online trafficking in copyrighted intellectual property and counterfeit goods.

Presented to the House Judiciary Committee, it builds on the similar PRO-IP Act of 2008 and the corresponding Senate bill, the PROTECT IP Act.

The originally proposed bill would allow the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as copyright holders, to seek court orders against websites accused of enabling or facilitating copyright infringement.

Depending on who makes the request, the court order could include barring online advertising networks and payment facilitators from doing business with the allegedly infringing website, barring search engines from linking to such sites, and requiring Internet service providers to block access to such sites. The bill would make unauthorized streaming of copyrighted content a crime, with a maximum penalty of five years in prison for ten such infringements within six months. The bill also gives immunity to Internet services that voluntarily take action against websites dedicated to infringement, while making liable for damages any copyright holder who knowingly misrepresents that a website is dedicated to infringement.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stop_Online_Piracy_Act

What is PIPA?

How PROTECT IP Act would affect you?

The PROTECT IP Act (Preventing Real Online Threats to Economic Creativity and Theft of Intellectual Property Act of 2011 or PIPA), also known as Senate Bill 968 or S. 968, is a proposed law with the stated goal of giving the US government and copyright holders additional tools to curb access to “rogue websites dedicated to infringing or counterfeit goods”, especially those registered outside the U.S.

The bill was introduced on May 12, 2011, by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and 11 bipartisan co-sponsors.

The Congressional Budget Office estimated that implementation of the bill would cost the federal government $47 million through 2016, to cover enforcement costs and the hiring and training of 22 new special agents and 26 support staff.

The Senate Judiciary Committee passed the bill, but Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR) placed a hold on it.

…. for more details visit: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PROTECT_IP_Act

How PIPA would affect you?

Protect IP Act Breaks the Internet

Protect IP Act Breaks the Internet

The bill defines infringement as distribution of illegal copies, counterfeit goods, or anti-digital rights management technology. Infringement exists if “facts or circumstances suggest [the site] is used, primarily as a means for engaging in, enabling, or facilitating the activities described.”
The bill says that it does not alter existing substantive trademark or copyright law.

The bill provides for “enhancing enforcement against rogue websites operated and registered overseas” and authorizes the United States Department of Justice to seek a court order in rem against websites dedicated to infringing activities, if through due diligence, an individual owner or operator cannot be located.

The bill requires the Attorney General to serve notice to the defendant.

Once the court issues an order, it could be served on financial transaction providers, Internet advertising services, Internet service providers, and information location tools to require them to stop financial transactions with the rogue site and remove links to it.

The term “information location tool” is borrowed from the Digital Millennium Copyright Act and is understood to refer to search engines but could cover other sites that link to content.

The Protect IP Act says that an “information location tool shall take technically feasible and reasonable measures, as expeditiously as possible, to remove or disable access to the Internet site associated with the domain name set forth in the order”. In addition, it must delete all hyperlinks to the offending “Internet site”.Source:PROTECT IP Act of 2011, S. 968, 112th Cong. § 3(d)(2)(D); “Text of S. 968,” Govtrack.us. May 26, 2011. Retrieved June 23, 2011. Bill Text – Protect IP Act

Nonauthoritative domain name servers would be ordered to take technically feasible and reasonable steps to prevent the domain name from resolving to the IP address of a website that had been found by the court to be “dedicated to infringing activities.”The website could still be reached by its IP address, but links or users that used the website’s domain name would not reach it. Search engines—such as Google—would be ordered to “(i) remove or disable access to the Internet site associated with the domain name set forth in the [court] order; or (ii) not serve a hypertext link to such Internet site.”

What people are saying about about SOPA and PIPA?

Members of Congress are trying to do the right thing by going after pirates and counterfeiters but SOPA and PIPA are the wrong way to do it.

1. SOPA and PIPA would censor the Web

The U.S. http://youtu.be/Qcbg29Q0DhAgovernment could order the blocking of sites using methods similar to those employed by China. Among other things, search engines could be forced to delete entire websites from their search results. That’s why 41 human rights organizations and 110 prominent law professors have expressed grave concerns about the bills.

2. SOPA and PIPA would be job-killers because they would create a new era of uncertainty for American business

Law-abiding U.S. internet companies would have to monitor everything users link to or upload or face the risk of time-consuming litigation. That’s why AOL, EBay, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Mozilla, Twitter, Yahoo and Zynga wrote a letter to Congress saying these bills “pose a serious risk to our industry’s continued track record of innovation and job-creation.” It’s also why 55 of America’s most successful venture capitalists expressed concern that PIPA “would stifle investment in Internet services, throttle innovation, and hurt American competitiveness”. More than 204 entrepreneurs told Congress that PIPA and SOPA would “hurt economic growth and chill innovation”.

3. SOPA and PIPA wouldn’t stop piracy


read more: https://www.google.com/landing/takeaction/sopa-pipa/

Protect IP Act Breaks the Internet

When I found out Fight for the Future needed help with their campaign against a new bill called PROTECT-IP, I had to take a little time away from Everything is a Remix Part 4 and produce the video above. PROTECT-IP is the latest piece of legislation aiming to chip away at your online rights in the name of protecting the entertainment industry’s business model. It’s legislation that won’t work, will give us yet more lawsuits, and will make the net worse.

Whether you lean right and hate business regulation, lean left and hate censorship, or lean neither way but hate useless legislation, PROTECT-IP is a bill everyone should oppose. I encourage you to head over to Fight For the Future and contact congress.

More here: http://fightforthefuture.org/pipa

So, it is up to you to decide support it or not.

Call your Senators today.

The Internet is a thriving ecosystem that powers our economy and our society. PIPA and SOPA threaten the web.

Join Our Censorship Protest!

Social Media Terms Glossary


Social Media Terms from A to Z

A: Aggregate – Aggregating content is the act of gathering information from across the web and making it available in one place. Example:

B: Blogoshere – Where all the blogs live on the Internet and where all the conversation happening around them.

BizBuzz – Syracuse Social Network.   Social media network’s twitter hash tag ( # ). Type #bizbuzz on Twitter to see the results

C: Crowdsourcing – Pulling together the expertise and enthusiasm of those outside your organization who can voluntarily contribute content, create products, and solve problems for you.

C: Captcha – an acronym for “Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart. Captcha’s are often used to help separate humans from spam robots when leaving comments on a blog.

D: del.icio.us & Digg – Popular social bookmarking sites that enable users to store, share, and organize their favorite web sites and web pages.

E: Engagement – be an active participant online. Engage with blogs by leaving comments, share information with friends on social sites like Facebook, and tweet and retweet your followers on Twitter.

F: Facebook – a popular social networking site where users can create profiles, add friends, share photos and communicate with a select group of people. Users can become “fans” of organizations, people, and other entities. Users can also join groups and enter networks organized by schools, workplaces, or location.

G: Groundswell – a fast and spontaneous social trend that gathers force and influences public opinion.

H: Hyper-local – news coverage on a smaller, local, community level than is usually provided by regional news outlets. Also known as “narrow-interest” news.

H: Hashtag – Hashtags can be used to organize conversations around a particular event or a popular topic of conversation on Twitter. By organizing tweets around a hashtag, users following and participating in a conversation can find all Tweets about that subject. Ex. #socialmediaa-z

I: Influencer – a person that is recognized in the online community as someone who affects others’ thoughts and opinions. An Influencer is generally sought out for his/her expertise and knowledge in a specific subject area.

J: Join – join conversations and discussions online. Share information and be an active participant in social media sites.

K: Keep it simple – ‘nuff said.

L: LinkedIn – is a social and business networking site used primarily by professionals for organizing and connecting with business contacts.

M: Micro Blogging – a form of blogging that consists of extremely brief updates such as text messages, Tweets, photos, or audio or video clips.

N: Network – a set of connections or a group of people that a user sets up consisting of other people with similar interests.

O: Online Community – a group of individuals who share common interests and use the internet to communicate, network, and share information with each other.

P: Participate – To make the most of social media, you need to participate. Share your ideas and connect with people by participating in conversations online.

Q: Quick – Social media is quick and agile. It doesn’t take a lot of time to get involved.

R: Retweet – rebroadcasting or resending a twitter message that someone else sent.

S: Share – share links, feeds, videos etc… by posting them to your Facebook, Twitter, blog, or other social media site.

T: Twitter – Twitter is a free social media site that gives users a way to engage in “micro-blogging,” with a large online community in short, 140-character-or-less, messages.

U: UGC – User-generated content (UGC) refers to various kinds of media content that is produced by the audience or user and shared publicly. An example of UGC are videos posted to YouTube.

V: Viral Marketing – Viral marketing is when an idea or concept is spread by word-of-mouth instead of traditional paid advertising or marketing avenues. When something goes viral in social media, it is shared repeatedly and spread around by users taking on a life of it’s own.

W: Widgets – portable web code that can be posted, shared, and installed on any HTML-based web site by anyone without requiring any additional sets of programs.

X: XML – is an acronym for “Extensible Markup Language”. XML is a popular set of rules used to electronically code documents so that they can be used for RSS feeds.

Y: YouTube – YouTube is a popular online video community that allows users to easily upload and share videos.

Z: Zip – $0, nada, zero, nil. The monetary cost of using most social media tools. Especially if they come from PBS!

Most Popular Social Networking Websites


As you remember from our post: “Introduction to Social Media. What is Social Media Networking?” – Social media is a set of tools that allows the audience create content and communicate among themselves.

A few examples: blogs, message boards or groups (like Google Groups or Yahoo Groups), commenting, ranking and sharing tools like you find on many news sites, blogs and operations like Digg social bookmarking and sharing tools like Delicious or Mixx user-generated content sites like YouTube and Flickr group instant messaging like Twitter live community chats, as standalone or complements to broadcasts platforms like Facebook and LinkedIn where people can create profiles, share content, create groups and interact in many other ways.

Read more about social media networking...

What are the Most Popular Social Networking Websites?


 1 | facebook
2 – eBizMBA Rank | 250,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 2 – Compete Rank | 2 – Quantcast Rank | 2 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010

 2 | MySpace
16 – eBizMBA Rank | 122,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 16 – Compete Rank | 16 – Quantcast Rank | 17 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010

 3 | twitter
27 – eBizMBA Rank | 80,500,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 39 – Compete Rank | 31 – Quantcast Rank | 11 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010

 4 | Linkedin
47 – eBizMBA Rank | 50,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 61 – Compete Rank | 50 – Quantcast Rank | 29 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010

 5 | Ning
143 – eBizMBA Rank | 42,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 180 – Compete Rank | 120 – Quantcast Rank | 128 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 6 | Tagged
225 – eBizMBA Rank | 30,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 382 – Compete Rank | 151 – Quantcast Rank | 141 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010

 7 | classmates
228 – eBizMBA Rank | 29,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 487 – Compete Rank | *425* – Quantcast Rank | 969 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 8 | hi5
479 – eBizMBA Rank | 27,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 983 – Compete Rank | 392 – Quantcast Rank | 62 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 9 | myyearbook
617 – eBizMBA Rank | 12,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 522 – Compete Rank | 293 – Quantcast Rank | 1,036 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 10 | Meetup
635 – eBizMBA Rank | 8,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 644 – Compete Rank | 732 – Quantcast Rank | 528 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 11 | bebo
655 – eBizMBA Rank | 7,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 944 – Compete Rank | 434 – Quantcast Rank | 588 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 12 | mylife
865 – eBizMBA Rank | 6,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 118 – Compete Rank | 688 – Quantcast Rank | 1,789 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 13 | friendster
955 – eBizMBA Rank | 5,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 1,920 – Compete Rank | 643 – Quantcast Rank | 301 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 14 | myHeritage
1,097 – eBizMBA Rank | 4,800,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 707 – Compete Rank | 595 – Quantcast Rank | 1,989 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 15 | Multiply
1,136 – eBizMBA Rank | 4,600,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 2,446 – Compete Rank | 677 – Quantcast Rank | 285 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 16 | orkut
1,303 – eBizMBA Rank | 4,500,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 2,219 – Compete Rank | *1,630* – Quantcast Rank | 59 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 17 | badoo
1,329 – eBizMBA Rank | 4,400,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 3,187 – Compete Rank | *650* – Quantcast Rank | 152 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 18 | gaiaonline
1,334 – eBizMBA Rank | 4,350,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 1,781 – Compete Rank | 733 – Quantcast Rank | 1,489 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 19 | BlackPlanet
1,952 – eBizMBA Rank | 4,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 1,322 – Compete Rank | *1,721* – Quantcast Rank | 2,814 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA

 20 | SkyRock
2,866 – eBizMBA Rank | 3,000,000 – Estimated Unique Monthly Visitors | 7,380 – Compete Rank | *980* – Quantcast Rank | 237 – Alexa Rank.
Most Popular Social Networking WebsitessUpdated 7/01/2010 | eBizMBA