How to modify hosts file on local computer?


Easily edit the host file on Windows, Mac, linux

Easily edit the host file on Windows, Mac, Linux

How to modify hosts file on local computer?

The hosts file is a computer file used by an operating system to map hostnames to IP addresses.

The hosts file is a plain text file, and is conventionally named hosts. Originally a HOSTS.TXT file and maintained centrally by Stanford Research Institute for the ARPANET, the hosts file predates the Domain Name System, which was first described in 1983 and implemented in 1984.

Prior to DNS, the hosts file was manually edited and served as a table of accessible hosts. It was due the size of the growing Internet and coincident growth of the hosts table that the more robust DNS was embraced and the hosts file supplanted.


Editing your hosts file will allow you to override the DNS for a domain, on that particular machine.

Can be used to test your site without the test link, prior to going live with SSL, verify an alias site works prior to DNS changes, or for other DNS related reasons.

This causes your local machine only to look directly at the IP specified.

Your hosts file will need to have two entries added that will contain the IP address you want the site to resolve to and the address. Adding the below two lines for example will point www.yourtesturl.com and yourtesturl.com to our current PHP5-ITK (“Refreshed” PHP5) cluster:

127.0.0.1  localhost loopback
::1        localhost

or
127.0.0.1 www.yourtesturl.com
127.0.0.1 yourtesturl.com

Below is how to locate and edit the hosts file on several OS platforms. Once the proper domain information is added you will save the file and your system will begin resolving to the specified IP. Once testing is finished these entries should be removed.

Contents

 

  • Windows 8
  • Vista and Windows 7
  • Windows NT/2000/XP
  • Linux
  • Mac OSX 10.0 – 10.1.5
  • Mac OSX 10.6 – 10.8

local host file

local host file

Windows 8

Editing a HOSTS File in Windows 8

Here is what you can do in order to edit the HOSTS file on Windows 8.

  • Copy the HOSTS file from the  C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc folder to your Desktop.
  • Open the copy from your Desktop in Notepad, and make all necessary changes.

Or directly open file location from NotePad or other PlainText editor like

 

Windows Vista and Windows 7

Vista and Windows 7 use User Account Control (UAC) so Notepad must be run as Administrator.

1. Click Start -> All Programs -> Accessories

2. Right click Notepad and select Run as administrator

3. Click Continue on the “Windows needs your permission” UAC window.

4. When Notepad opens Click File -> Open

5. In the filename field type C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts

6. Click Open

 

 

Windows NT/2000/XP

1. Click Start -> All Programs -> Accessories -> Notepad

2. Click File -> Open

3. In the filename field type C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\etc\hosts

4. Click Open

 

Linux

1. Open a terminal window

2. Type sudo nano /etc/hosts (you can substitute any text editor)

3. Enter your password

 

 

Mac OS X 10.0 – 10.1.5

1. Open /Applications/Utilities/NetInfo Manager.

2. To allow editing the NetInfo database, click the padlock in the lower left corner of the window.

3. Enter your Admin password and click OK

4. In the second column of the browser view, select the node named “machines.” You will see entries for -DHCP-, broadcasthost, and localhost in the third column.

5. The quickest way to create a new entry is to duplicate an existing one. So select the “localhost” item in the third column.

6. Choose Duplicate from the Edit menu. A confirmation alert appears.

7. Click Duplicate. A new entry called “localhost copy” appears, and its properties are shown below the browser view.

8. Double-click the value of the ip_address property and enter the IP address of the other computer.

9. Double-click the value of the name property and enter the hostname you want for the other computer.

10. Click the serves property and choose Delete from the Edit menu.

11. Choose Save from the File menu. A confirmation alert appears.

12. Click Update this copy.

13. Repeat steps 6 through 12 for each additional host entry you wish to add.

14. Choose Quit from the NetInfo Manager menu. You do not need to restart the computer.

 

Mac OS X 10.6 – 10.1.8

1. Open Applications > Utilities > Terminal.

2. Open the hosts file by typing the following in the Terminal window:

sudo nano /private/etc/hosts

Type your user password when prompted

3. Edit the Host File,The hosts file contains some comments (lines starting with the # symbol), as well as some default hostname mappings (e.g. 127.0.0.1 – local host). Append your new mappings underneath the default ones.

4. Save the Host File, When done editing the hosts file, press Control+x to save the file.

5. Make your changes take effect by flushing the DNS cache with the following command:

$ dscacheutil -flushcache

6. New mappings should now take effect.

 

 

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What should a site owner do if they think they might be affected by Panda?


How will webmaster come to know whether website is hit by Panda?

And, if  site is already hit, how to recover from Panda?

Answer: You need to read UNDERSTAND and implement Google Webmaster Guideline not when site hit but before and after that happens.

Implementation is a key.

Improve site contents on regular basis if possible.

Understanding Google Webmaster Guideline correctly – Success Factors for Implementation.

Answer from Matt Cutts ‎ Google Software Engineer:

Published on Sep 11, 2013

Reprinted with sole purpose to remind webmasters and website owners to read Google Webmaster Guideline.

Do not pay for SEO all info you every need Google provide.

But if you do not have time to read and follow simple and common scene instructions do not blame Google if your site is our of first page on Google Organic Search results
Some website owner looking for one single reason site was “hit” by algorithm update… ;-(

how to recover from google panda updateWhat counts as a high-quality site?

Our site quality algorithms are aimed at helping people find “high-quality” sites by reducing the rankings of low-quality content. The recent “Panda” change tackles the difficult task of algorithmically assessing website quality. Taking a step back, we wanted to explain some of the ideas and research that drive the development of our algorithms.

Below are some questions that one could use to access the “quality” of a page or an article. These are the kinds of questions we ask ourselves as we write algorithms that attempt to assess site quality. Think of it as our take at encoding what we think our users want.

Of course, we aren’t disclosing the actual ranking signals used in our algorithms because we don’t want folks to game our search results; but if you want to step into Google’s mindset, the questions below provide some guidance on how we’ve been looking at the issue:

  • Would you trust the information presented in this article?
  • Is this article written by an expert or enthusiast who knows the topic well, or is it more shallow in nature?
  • Does the site have duplicate, overlapping, or redundant articles on the same or similar topics with slightly different keyword variations?
  • Would you be comfortable giving your credit card information to this site?
  • Does this article have spelling, stylistic, or factual errors?
  • Are the topics driven by genuine interests of readers of the site, or does the site generate content by attempting to guess what might rank well in search engines?
  • Does the article provide original content or information, original reporting, original research, or original analysis?
  • Does the page provide substantial value when compared to other pages in search results?
  • How much quality control is done on content?
  • Does the article describe both sides of a story?
  • Is the site a recognized authority on its topic?
  • Is the content mass-produced by or outsourced to a large number of creators, or spread across a large network of sites, so that individual pages or sites don’t get as much attention or care?
  • Was the article edited well, or does it appear sloppy or hastily produced?
  • For a health related query, would you trust information from this site?
  • Would you recognize this site as an authoritative source when mentioned by name?
  • Does this article provide a complete or comprehensive description of the topic?
  • Does this article contain insightful analysis or interesting information that is beyond obvious?
  • Is this the sort of page you’d want to bookmark, share with a friend, or recommend?
  • Does this article have an excessive amount of ads that distract from or interfere with the main content?
  • Would you expect to see this article in a printed magazine, encyclopedia or book?
  • Are the articles short, unsubstantial, or otherwise lacking in helpful specifics?
  • Are the pages produced with great care and attention to detail vs. less attention to detail?
  • Would users complain when they see pages from this site?

Writing an algorithm to assess page or site quality is a much harder task, but we hope the questions above give some insight into how we try to write algorithms that distinguish higher-quality sites from lower-quality sites.

What you can do

We’ve been hearing from many of you that you want more guidance on what you can do to improve your rankings on Google, particularly if you think you’ve been impacted by the Panda update. We encourage you to keep questions like the ones above in mind as you focus on developing high-quality content rather than trying to optimize for any particular Google algorithm.

One other specific piece of guidance we’ve offered is that low-quality content on some parts of a website can impact the whole site’s rankings, and thus removing low quality pages, merging or improving the content of individual shallow pages into more useful pages, or moving low quality pages to a different domain could eventually help the rankings of your higher-quality content.

We’re continuing to work on additional algorithmic iterations to help webmasters operating high-quality sites get more traffic from search. As you continue to improve your sites, rather than focusing on one particular algorithmic tweak, we encourage you to ask yourself the same sorts of questions we ask when looking at the big picture. This way your site will be more likely to rank well for the long-term. In the meantime, if you have feedback, please tell us through our Webmaster Forum. We continue to monitor threads on the forum and pass site info on to the search quality team as we work on future iterations of our ranking algorithms.

Some ideas on how to evaluate the quality of a site:
http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspo…

Have a question? Ask it in our Webmaster Help Forum: http://groups.google.com/a/googleprod…

Want your question to be answered on a video like this? Follow us on Twitter and look for an announcement when we take new questions: http://twitter.com/googlewmc

More videos: http://www.youtube.com/GoogleWebmaste…
Webmaster Central Blog: http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspo…
Webmaster Central: http://www.google.com/webmasters/

All About SEO on WordPress.com


All About SEO on WordPress.com.

SEO DOs and DON’Ts

Do:
  • Regularly publish original content.
  • Use a few precise categories and tags.
  • Write for human ears.
  • Build your traffic in smart, organic ways.
  • Choose simple, meaningful post slugs.
  • Create a descriptive tagline.
  • Include keywords selectively.
Don’t:
  • Start duplicate sites.
  • “Stuff” your site with irrelevant, broad categories, tags, or buzzwords.
  • Write with search engines in mind.
  • Purchase or exchange meaningless “backlinks.”
  • Buy into SEO fads.
  • Worry too much about SEO at the expense of writing good content!

We get a lot of questions about SEO here on WordPress.com, and no wonder — you work hard on your site and want to get the word out! SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization. SEO recommendations are intended to help your site rank higher and more accurately in search engines, like Google. Say you write a blog about sailboats. When someone Googles “sailboats,” how many pages of results do they have to scroll through before they see a link to your blog? The goal behind having good SEO is to increase your website’s SERP (Search Engine Results Page) ranking.

many sailboats

On the busy internet, it can be tough to make your “sailboat” stand out from all the others.

Ideally, you want your link to be on the first page of results. The best ways to accomplish this are:

  • consistently publish useful, original posts about sailboats; and
  • promote your blog in intelligent ways to people who are looking for information about your topic.

The more traffic your blog receives for sailboat-related searches, the higher it will climb in Google’s results. No mystery to that, right? But if you look around the internet, you’ll find dubious advice about how to increase your blog’s SERP ranking. Some of the suggestions you’ll find are just extra busywork, but some can actually end up hurting you with Google.

Common myths about SEO

Myth: I need a plugin for SEO.

Fact: WordPress.com has great SEO right out of the box — you don’t have to do anything extra. In fact, WordPress takes care of 80-90 percent of the mechanics of SEO for you, according to Matt Cutts, head of Google’s webspam team. All of our themes are optimized for search engines, which means they are designed to make it easy for the Googlebot (and other search engines) to crawl through them and discover all the content.

Myth: I need to regularly submit Sitemaps to Google so it knows I’m blogging regularly.

Fact: Every WordPress.com blog has an XML Sitemap. To view your Sitemap, type yourblogname.wordpress.com/sitemap.xml in your browser’s address bar. What you see there is code, so it’s not meant to be easily readable by us. For the Googlebot, however, it’s a “what’s hot” guide to the latest and greatest on your site. WordPress.com also automatically sends notifications to Google every time you publish or update a post or page. This is similar to how your subscribers get email updates. Every time you post, you’re telling Google, “Hey! Check this out.”

XML Sitemap

Here’s how this blog’s XML Sitemap looks in Chrome.

Myth: The more tags and categories I use for a post, the better it is for Google.

Fact: Using a bunch of tags and categories that have little to do with your posts won’t increase your site’s visibility. Actually, Google doesn’t rely on tags or categories — it can tell what your post is about from its content (or it should be able to), as Matt Cutts explains here. Plus, any post on WordPress.com with too many categories and tags will be excluded from the Reader Topics pages. It’s best to use only a few, carefully selected categories and tags for each post — those that are most relevant to what the post is about. Likewise, avoid overly broad tags: “catamaran” is a better tag than “boat.”

Myth: Creating several identical sites about sailboats and making frequent use of sailboat-related terminology in my posts will help me get a lot of sailboat-related traffic.

Fact: Google frowns on duplicate content, and if you have multiple identical sites, your search ranking will suffer for it. Also, while it’s a good idea to use accurate keywords in your posts and post titles, going overboard with so-called “keyword stuffing” will hurt your SERP rank. Strive for clear, natural-sounding writing that reads like it was intended for human ears, not search engine crawlers.

Myth: One effective way to improve my blog’s SERP rank is to purchase or exchange links (sometimes known as “backlinks”) with as many bloggers as possible, so that there’s a lot of traffic going to my blog.

Fact: If you blog about sailboats, the more sailboat-focused sites and articles that organically link to your blog as a fantastic source of sailboat info, the better. On the other hand, Google won’t be impressed if it sees a ton of links to your sailboat blog from blogs about, say, marketing, basketry, lipstick, electronics, or SEO tactics.

Think of it this way: Google wants people to use its search engine as much as you want them to visit your website, so its goal is to return the most useful results for any given query. The more tactics bloggers come up with to fool Google into ranking their sites higher than they deserve to be, the more Google corrects its search algorithms to screen out such bad behavior.

Paying for backlinks is a case in point: in April 2012, Google introduced its controversial Penguin algorithm that improved screening for this bad practice, and many bloggers with excessive backlinks found that their SERP rank plummeted. The moral of this story is that while SEO fads might bump your site artificially for a bit, in the long run, they won’t work.

Myth: SEO requires a strategy and possibly an expert…

For more read original post: http://en.blog.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/seo-on-wordpress-com/

For more information about social media networking, how to add podcast to your website, SEO tips, tricks, social media  good practice, online tools and how to market your site visit New York Web Designer Agency Website

Email Marketing Best Practices


Did you know?  Researchers estimate that United States firms alone spent US $600 million on email marketing in 2010.

So it big Market for Email marketing if you know how to use it.

What is Email Marketing?

By Wikipedia: Email marketing is a form of direct marketing which uses electronic mail as a means of communicating commercial or fund-raising messages to an audience. In its broadest sense, every email sent to a potential or current customer could be considered email marketing. However, the term is usually used to refer to:

  • sending email messages with the purpose of enhancing the relationship of a merchant with its current or previous customers, to encourage customer loyalty and repeat business,
  • sending email messages with the purpose of acquiring new customers or convincing current customers to purchase something immediately,
  • adding advertisements to email messages sent by other companies to their customers, and
  • sending email messages over the Internet, as email did and does exist outside the Internet

Advantages of Email Marketing

Email marketing (on the Internet) is popular with companies for several reasons:

  • An exact return on investment can be tracked (“track to basket”) and has proven to be high when done properly. Email marketing is often reported as second only to search marketing as the most effective online marketing tactic.
  • Advertisers can reach substantial numbers of email subscribers who have opted in (i.e., consented) to receive email communications on subjects of interest to them.
  • Over half of Internet users check or send email on a typical day.
  • Email is popular with digital marketers, rising an estimated 15% in 2009 to £292m in the UK.

Disadvantages of Email Marketing

A report issued by the email services company Return Path, as of mid-2008 email deliverability is still an issue for legitimate marketers. According to the report, legitimate email servers averaged a delivery rate of 56%; twenty percent of the messages were rejected, and eight percent were filtered.

Companies considering the use of an email marketing program must make sure that their program does not violate spam laws such as the United States’ Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act (CAN-SPAM), the European Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations 2003, or their Internet service provider’s acceptable use policy.

Important tips for anyone managing the email marketing.
1. Send emails to persons who have requested to receive them.

2. Include content relevant to the type of content the person has requested.

3. Be consistent with your sending frequency.  Pick a schedule, whether it is weekly, biweekly,
or monthly and as often as you can stick to that schedule.

4. In most cases it is best to send business to business emails Tuesday through Thursday. We’ve found that the best
times of the day to send are just after the start of the day around 9:30am or just after lunch around 1:30pm. It
is best to avoid sending business to business emails after 4pm or on weekends.

5. In most cases it is best to send business to consumer emails either between 5pm and 8pm Tuesday through Thursday or between Friday evening and Sunday afternoon.

6. To improve deliverability, add a message at the top of your emails that says something like: “To ensure receipt of
our emails, please add you@mycompany.com to your Address Book.”

7. Make the From Name for your messages either your company name or the name of a person at your company.
Once you choose a From Name, keep it consistent. During the split second decision subscribers make whether
to open your email, the most important factor in their decision is whether the From Name is familiar to them.

8. Be sure to include both a plain text and an HTML version of your newsletter.   If you don’t
include a plain text message, around 5% of your recipients will see a message with nothing in it.

9. Don’t use all caps or multiple exclamation marks within your subject line or body. Doing this will trigger spam
filters.

10. Build your list at every opportunity you have. If you have a retail location, add a point- of-sale sign-up form. At conferences or events, bring a paper sign-up form or have a laptop with a sign- up form set up and available for interested parties. Finally, add your newsletter signup form to every page on your web site.

Email Marketing Terms.

1. ROI (Return on Investment) – Your ROI is the measure of the profit you make and/or costs saved at your business. For your email marketing campaigns you calculate cost of sending email plus time.

ROI = [(Payback – Investment)/Investment)]*100

So if you made $780 on your email campaign, your time was worth $50 to create it and it costs $15 to send it, it would look like this:

(($780 – $65)/$65)*100 = 1100% ROI (which is really good!)

If you want to take it a step further subtract your cost of your products or services as well.

2. Open Rate – Your open rate is simply the number recipients who opened your HTML emails. It is typically measured as a percentage of the total number of emails sent, although calculation methods may differ. The open rate is considered a useful metric for judging response to an email campaign but it should be noted that open rates for text emails can’t be calculated AND some email clients don’t display images as a default which would under report your total number of opens.

3. Above the Fold – The bottom of your browser window or the bottom of your email before you have to start scrolling is commonly referred to as the “fold”. These viewable areas should be where your most important information should be located since it’s the first thing your viewer will see.

4. Preview Pane – Email programs like Microsoft Outlook, Entourage, and Mac Mail allow users to view email through a preview pane before your recipient clicks to open. The preview pane is important to bear in mind when composing the opening lines of an email so you can get your recipient’s attention fast.

5. Copy – Your copy is simply the text of the email you write.

6. Hosted Email – A hosted version of an email allows users to view the email message as a web page, ensuring that all formatting remains intact. VerticalResponse does this for you for free you just need to include the “hosted version” link. Hosted versions of your email are also great for you to send your Twitter and Facebook followers to when you launch your campaign.

7. Spoofing – Email spoofing involves forging a sender’s address on email messages. It can be used by malicious individuals to mislead email recipients into reading and responding to deceptive mail. These fake messages can jeopardize the online privacy of consumers and damage the reputation of the companies purported to have sent the messages. Spoofed email often contains phishing scams. VerticalResponse doesn’t allow for this in our systems.

8. Phishing – In a phishing scam, a spammer, posing as a trusted party such as a bank or reputable online vendor, sends email messages directing recipients to web sites that appear to be official but are in reality fraudulent. Visitors to these web sites are asked to disclose personal information, such as credit card numbers, or to purchase counterfeit or pirated products.

9. Targeting – Targeting gives you the ability to deliver emails to those most likely to respond to your emails, based on a variety of things like their geographic, demographic, psychographic and behavioral information.

10. Whitelists – Whitelists are usually created by an ISP (internet service provider) and are made up of commercial emailers (including email service providers — ESPs) who have been approved to send email through their gates. The ISP requires a list of IP (internet protocol) addresses that email will be sent from, and in some cases a test period where the commercial emailer will be approved or rejected. VerticalResponse is on all available whitelists.

11. Web Friendly Fonts – Almost all web browsers are capable of displaying four primary fonts properly: Times, Arial, Helvetica, and Verdana, as well as their variants (Arial Narrow, Times New Roman, etc.) If a web developer decides to stray from one of these fonts he or she risks browser compatibility problems and the prospect that their pages may render inaccurately when viewed through certain web browsers.

Places to Include Information on How to Subscribe to Your Newsletter
6. On customer satisfaction surveys
7. On product shipping forms
8. In confirmation or transaction emails
9. On credit card receipts
10. On warranty and product registration cards
11. On Invoices
12. Within articles
13. Within press releases
14. On trade show lead forms
15. On sweepstakes entry forms
16. On shopping cart order forms
17. Company publications

How to Promote Business on YouTube.com?


Part 1: Choose Youtube.com account type to fit your needs

Targeting your content by account type

When you sign up for a new account you are given the chance to choose which account type you would like. While one of the options is ‘standard’, it makes a lot more sense to choose from the other possibilities. You can select from the following categories:

  • A Director account – great if you are producing your own web videos. This account allows you to to add custom items and a logo to your Profile pages
  • A Musician account – which is a good opportunity if you are hoping to promote your music through YouTube. In addition to your custom logo and choice of music genre, you can also display tour date information and CD purchase links on your profile pages
  • A Comedian account – which is of course a good way of promoting your comedy show or stand-up act. This allows you to add your custom log, comedy style, show date information and CD purchase links on your profile pages
  • A Guru account – which is for anyone that is an expert in a particular field, whether that be cooking or web design. This account lets you choose a custom logo, genre and links to your other websites from your profile pages

If you already have a YouTube account but want to take advantage of this feature, you can do so by converting your account type from your channel info page.  It is possible to change at any time.

Part 2: Create Your Own Channel

Create a channel and customize to feature your best videos.  This alone will drastically boost your views.

Search your brand on YouTube and see what the existing conversation looks like. Then try reaching out to people who already have an affinity for your product or service by commenting on their videos and/or “friending” them.

Remember that YouTube is an online community, and if you’re not participating in the dialogue, then you are missing the opportunity for true engagement.

Part 3: YouTube Video Annotations.

Video SEO recommendation for YouTube’s annotations

YouTube should treat annotations as indexable metadata, just like it does with the title, description and tags entry fields.
Annotations are helpful text content that can improve a video’s relevancy to the viewer (similar to the description field), which is under the control of the account holder with permission-based controls for collaboration (so spam shouldn’t be an issue).

You control what the annotations say, where they appear on the video, and when they appear and disappear.

The annotations can also be coupled with subtitles (which can be translated into multiple languages by YouTube) to complement them and add more depth of information. Between the two of them you might not need to worry about sound and dialog any longer as you can subtitle everything and explain it, even pausing the video to give the viewer time to consume the information.

Annotations might be one of the best innovations in online video since the creation of the interactive button overlay. In fact they’re almost the same and not really new. But where Google and YouTube go, other follow

Annotations give you a way to offer far more information but still present it in a video format. Of course balancing the usage of the annotations so as not to overwhelm the video content or the viewer will be an art in and of itself.

For a more advanced guide to help you get the most out of the Annotations Editor, look here.

Part 4: Use the Bulletin Board and Youtube email.

This is a great feature that lets you start a conversation around your own videos. But don’t limit yourself to your own bulletin boards; use others’ too.
Remember –  YouTube is a social community as much as it is a video-sharing site.  As such, there is nothing terrible about reaching out to other users and letting them know about your content, your thoughts, or your admiration of their work.

Bulletins are  way of creating short messages on your own channel profile, or leaving messages for users on their profile pages. Bulletins are super-short messages about your status, new releases or anything else you might want to broadcast to the world via your YouTube channel.

Use bulletins for quick comments on other user’s pages, and in doing so you are likely to pique their interest enough for them to come and check out your profile and maybe even subscribe if they like what they see.  Posting bulletins to your own profile is also an effective way to keep your viewers in the loop

Part 5: Add Friends and Use Video Respond

Search for popular videos related to yours and post your video as a response to them. Leverage the views that other videos get.

People often forget that YouTube is a social network. Add friends to your list and engage with them.


Part 6: Use different Video Customization Options

You can specify the width and height of the embedded video by adding &w=... or &w=...&h=...to the shortcode. It will automatically adapt to your theme’s content length and give you preferred dimensions.

  • You can disable related videos by appending &rel=0
  • You can turn on the search box by appending &showsearch=1

For example, this shortcode

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eu4Jgiz6lsA=640&h=385]

Examples:

Come back soon we will add more soon…

21 Interview Questions that you Might be Asked


Questions You May Be Asked During an Interview for Web Developer Position

Interviewing  Intermediate Web Developer’s Name:_____________

1. How is your experience relevant to this job?

2. What environments allow you to be more effective?

3. What situations excite and motivate you?

4. How have you handled criticism of your work?

5. Compare this job to others you are perusing.

6. What’s your dream job?

7. What industry sites and blogs do you read regularly?

8. Do you prefer to work alone or on a team? Please explain your point.

9. How comfortable are you with writing XHTML entirely by hand?
Please write HTML code for simple for transitional XHTML page:
with:
• all basic meta tags (as more as you think necessary),
• link to external sample.css file
• link to external sample.js file
• table with 2 rows and 2 columns,
• text link to external page,
• image link to external page
• insert image to the page
• embed iframe

10. Please provide links to your recently completed project. Please explain your role in the projects.
Example: Single web developer or/and web designer, web developer or/and web designer in the team…11. Can you write table-less XHTML? Do you validate your code?
Please write example of table-less XHTML page. We want to see sample of code.

12. What are a few of your favorite development tools and why?

13. What skills and technologies are you the most interested in improving upon or learning?

14. Provide link to your portfolio. Please explain why you build it this way.

15. What sized websites have you worked on in the past?
Please provide link and describe scope of the projects.

16. What are a few sites you admire and why? (from a webdev perspective)

17. I just pulled up the website someone’s built and the browser is displaying a blank page. Walk us through the steps you’d take to troubleshoot the problem.

18. What’s your favorite development language and why? What other features (if any) do you wish you could add to this language?

19. Do you find any particular languages or technologies intimidating?

20. What web browser do you use and why?

21. What are a few personal web projects you’ve got going on?